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What is happening with Brexit? Latest news as court rules Boris Johnson’s parliament suspension unlawful

DEFIANT Boris Johnson has said he would rather be “dead in a ditch” than delay leaving the EU.

Here’s the latest on what’s happening with Brexit as parliament suspensions is underway until the Queen’s speech on October 14.

PA:Press Association
Boris said he would rather be ‘dead in a ditch’ than grovel to Brussels for a Brexit[/caption]

What’s the latest?

Brexit blockers have been handed a boost after a Scottish court said Boris was UNLAWFUL to shutdown Parliament.

Top judges found in favour of an appeal against the PM and the case will go to the Supreme Court next week.

However, no measure is being made to cancel the suspension of Parliament, the Court of Session in Edinburgh heard today.

All three of the judges in Scotland’s highest appeal court ruled the shutdown was “unlawful”, it has been reported.

Labour abstainers blocked Boris Johnson’s bid to hold a general election for a second time.

The PM wanted the Commons to back a national poll on October 15 but he was defeated after Labour abstained for a second time, leaving him short of the two-thirds majority needed.

It would have taken a Parliamentary miracle for Mr Johnson to win the vote with neither Mr Corbyn or Lib Dem leader Jo Swinson willing to back an election until a three-month Brexit delay has been secured.

Mr Johnson won 293 votes – 141 MPs short of the 434 he needed to call an election.

He has now lost six out of six votes, an all-time record for a Prime Minister.

With parliament set to prorogue until October 15, it means there now cannot be an election until November – after the PM’s “do or die” Brexit date of October 31.

It comes as the parliament is suspended until October 14, when MPs are set to return for the Queen’s Speech.

On the 17th, EU leaders are set to meet for a final council summit before Brexit, before a deadline for the no-deal legislation come into effect on the 19th.

Boris Johnson speaking outside Number 10 Downing Street
Reuters

Nigel Farage has spelt out his price for an election deal with the Tories – to give his Brexit Party a free run in 80 to 90 parliamentary seats.

In exchange, the anti-EU party chief has told No10 he would not to field any candidates against sitting Tory MPs and in the Conservatives’ target seats.

The landmark offer has been relayed to Boris Johnson by senior Tory figures after discreet conversations with Mr Farage opened up, The Sun has been told.

Labour deputy Tom Watson has called for a second referendum ahead of election.

Watson said Labour must prioritise reversing Brexit through another referendum, over winning power in a general election.

He will warn that a snap election before the end of the year may fail to resolve the current deadlock, reported BBC News.

What did Boris Johnson say about a General Election?

Boris Johnson said any move to block a No Deal Brexit would weaken his hand in attempting to negotiate an agreement with Brussels.

If MPs backed a bill that would force him to seek an extension to our leaving date if there was no deal, then he would seek a general election.

After they did just that, the Prime Minister followed suit with a motion seeking the two-thirds majority needed to go to the polls on October 1

But 298 MPs backed him – far short of 434 MPs he needed to get it through.

Earlier in the week, addressing the nation outside Number 10 on Monday, September 2, the Prime Minister insisted: “I don’t want an election, you don’t want an election.”

He said that if MPs voted to block the option of a No Deal Brexit they would “plainly chop the legs out from under the UK position” when he is negotiating.

The vote was lost after Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn ordered his MPs to abstain in the knowledge this would prevent Boris getting the two thirds majority he needed.

That prompted a furious Mr Johnson brand Corbyn “chicken” saying he was “the first leader of the opposition in the democratic history of our country to refuse the invitation of an election”.

Labour’s mass abstention last night came despite Mr Corbyn and other senior figures in his party having called for a general election as soon as possible more than 15 times so far — in this year alone.


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